Challenges of interracial dating

I stress “potentially” since often it is assumed that people of different ethnicities are automatically opposites.

challenges of interracial dating-29

Nathaniel Lancaster, the Student Association representative for BSU, said the group’s motivation for hosting the event with several different cultural student groups stemmed from a desire for unity.“It unites different cultures and races, bringing them together through a topic of relationships,” said Lancaster, a senior majoring in political science. “We want to show others that although we share different religions and races, we still all have similar customs,” said Momplaisir, a junior majoring in history.(The Ethics of Interracial Marriage) So yes, interracial marriages can potentially be harder, yet we have to avoid the conjecture that it absolutely will be harder as well as the notion that because it may be hard, it should be avoided. It can be physically, emotionally, psychologically, and spiritually draining. How should you deal with a family that is rejecting you, or your significant other, based on ethnicity?Piper again has helpful words: Here is where Christ makes the difference. It comes with disapproving looks, racist and prejudice comments, rejection, and poor theological arguments against your interracial relationship from loved ones who have previously supported and loved you well. The goal of this article is not to provide a biblical basis for interracial marriage.Christ does not call us to a prudent life, but to a God-centered, Christ-exalting, justice-advancing, counter-cultural, risk-taking life of love and courage. I’m thankful for John Piper’s and Trillia Newbell’s writings on this.

Will it be harder to be married to another race, and will it be harder for the kids? What I would like to provide here is biblical and practical advice on to how to engage a disapproving family, whether it is your own or your significant other’s, toward the ends of God being glorified, sin mortified, Satan horrified, and all involved edified. The term “enemy” may sound a bit harsh to some, but when a family is opposing you or your relationship simply because of the racial dynamic (while simultaneously making a relationship with a potential spouse more difficult), it’s hard to view them as anything else. Biblical love is the basis for everything I have to say here. The Scriptures call us to love that prevails and changes our current circumstances.

I recently got into a interesting conversation with a few White women I know, who happen to date Black or minority men, and it really highlighted a need to explore the complexities of such unions in greater depth.

Though I do support the right to love, regardless of color (or gender/gender identity), I also believe that the challenges of interracial relationships are often obscure and infrequently discussed.

Rather than focus on blogging about this fruitless subject, I began to think about why these are such hotbed topics to begin with.

Why is it, on the heels of 2012, are we so fascinated with racial distinctiveness, yet not interested at all in what unites us?

The panel was split into discussions about two major aspects of relationships: differences between the female and male perceptions of dating, and bringing a partner of a different background to meet the parents. The hosts posed the question of how different families would react to their children bringing home a girlfriend or boyfriend of a different culture, race or religion.